What are Sustainability Transformation Partnerships (STPs)? (asked November 2016).

The NHS Shared Planning Guidance asked every local health and care system in England to come together to create their own ambitious local plan for accelerating the implementation of the Five Year Forward View (5YFV).

These blueprints, called Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs), are place-based, multi-year plans built around the needs of local populations.

STPs will help drive a genuine and sustainable transformation in health and care between 2016 and 2021. They will also help build and strengthen local relationships, enabling a shared understanding of where we are now, our ambition for 2021 and the steps needed to get us there.

These plans are also described as the local version of a national plan called the Five Year Forward View, published in 2014. This sets out a vision of a better NHS, the steps we should take to get us there, and how everyone involved need to work together.

However they are described as the local place-based plans written with the aim of ensuring that we all receive better care, are healthier, and have health and care services which run more efficiently by early 2021.

How many STPs are there? (asked November 2016)

To deliver these plans NHS providers, Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), local councils, and other health and care services have come together to form 44 STP ‘footprints’. These are established within ‘geographical’ areas, in which people and organisations will work together to develop the plans to transform the way that health and care is planned and delivered for their populations.

These footprints are of a scale which should support transformative change and the implementation of the Five Year Forward View vision of better health and wellbeing, improved quality of care, and stronger NHS finance and efficiency.

What is happening in West Yorkshire and Harrogate? (asked November 2016)

Health services, local councils and care providers have been working across West Yorkshire and Harrogate to develop a region-wide Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP).

Closer partnership working is at the very core of our STP. Over the past six months the leadership and staff of the West Yorkshire and Harrogate health and care organisations have been working hard on how we respond to the challenges we face, whilst delivering quality care and working towards achieving our vision.

West Yorkshire and Harrogate STP area covers eleven Clinical Commissioning Groups (which design, specify and buy care for local people), six local council boundaries, as well as services provided by a number of health and social care organisations, such as mental health, community and hospitals. Over time these organisational differences will become less important as we want to put people and communities above individual organisational boundaries.

The West Yorkshire and Harrogate STP is built from six local area place-based plans; Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Harrogate and Rural District, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield.

This is based around the established relationships of the six Health and Wellbeing Boards and builds on their local health and wellbeing strategies.

What is the vision? (asked November 2016)

Our vision for West Yorkshire and Harrogate is for everyone to have the best possible outcomes for their health and wellbeing. At the heart of this are the following ambitions:

1. Healthy places

  • We will improve the way services are provided with a greater focus on preventing illness, or identifying and managing this at an early stage wherever possible
  • We will support people to manage their own care, where safe to do so, with peer support and technology provided in their communities to help with self-care
  • Care will be person centred, simpler and easier to navigate
  • There will be joined-up community services across physical and mental health as well as much closer working with social care.

2. High quality and efficient services

  • Hospitals will work more closely together, providing physical and mental healthcare to a consistently high standard by organisations sharing knowledge, skills, expertise and care records, where appropriate
  • The way that services are designed and contracted will change. We will move to a single commissioning arrangement between Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) and local councils. This will ensure a stronger focus on local places and engagement. There will also be a stronger West Yorkshire and Harrogate commissioning function for some services
  • We will share our staff and buildings where it makes sense to do so; to make the best use of the resources we have between us and to help further service investment.

3. A health and care service that works for everyone, including our staff

  • West Yorkshire and Harrogate will be a great place to work
  • We will always work with people in how we design, plan and provide care and support
  • West Yorkshire and Harrogate will be an international destination for health innovation.

What will the West Yorkshire and Harrogate approach be? (asked January 2017)

To support our six local places we are carrying out a range of work collectively across the STP wide area. When we work in this way it is for one or more of three reasons:
  • Services cut across the area and beyond the six local places. For example, some services are not provided everywhere and require people to travel across local places i.e. stroke and cancer support.
  • There are benefits from doing the work once and sharing, so we make the best use of the skill and expertise we have.
  • Working together can deliver a greater benefit than working separately.
On this basis we have identified nine priorities for which we will work across a larger area. These are:
  • Prevention
  • Primary and community services
  • Mental health
  • Stroke
  • Cancer
  • Urgent and emergency care
  • Specialised services
  • Hospitals working together
  • Standardisation of commissioning policies

We plan to better organise and simplify urgent and emergency care so people get the very best care at the right time in the right place. This will mean clearer coordination and better organisation of urgent care services (including primary care, mental health, ambulances and urgent care centres) so they work together and people know where they can get the help you need.

We aim to improve on our four hour accident and emergency standard by March 2017 to ensure everyone is seen within this time, and we will continue to improve on this.

The demand for planned care (when you have a booked appointment to see a specialist or have an operation) is placing ongoing pressure on services. Unfortunately as a result people are waiting longer for appointments - we aim to meet our 18 week referral to treatment standard over the next five years across the area.

Improving patient experiences, choice and delivering high quality, safe care across seven days of the week is also a priority.

Which organisations are involved in producing the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Partnership (asked January 2017)

Clinical commissioning groups

  • NHS Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven CCG
  • NHS Bradford City CCG
  • NHS Bradford District CCG
  • NHS Calderdale CCG
  • NHS Greater Huddersfield CCG
  • NHS Harrogate and Rural District CCG
  • NHS Leeds North CCG
  • NHS Leeds South and East CCG
  • NHS Leeds West CCG
  • NHS North Kirklees CCG
  • NHS Wakefield CCG

Local authorities

  • Bradford Metropolitan District Council
  • Calderdale Council
  • Craven District Council
  • Harrogate Borough Council
  • Kirklees Council
  • Leeds City Council
  • North Yorkshire County Council
  • Wakefield Council

NHS care providers

  • Airedale NHS Foundation Trust
  • Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust
  • Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust
  • Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust
  • Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust
  • Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Locala Community Partnerships
  • The Mid-Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust
  • South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Tees Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust
  • Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust

Other organisations involved

  • NHS England
  • Public Health England
  • Local Health and Wellbeing Boards, including representatives from West Yorkshire Police,West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service, Local Care Direct and Locala Community Partnership
  • Healthwatch

How were the sustainability transformation footprints agreed? (asked January 2017)

The NHS Shared Planning Guidance asked each area to develop a proposed STP ‘geographical footprint’ by 29 January 2016, engaging with local councils and other partners on what this should look like. The footprints should be locally defined, based on communities, existing working relationships, patient flows and take account of the scale needed to deliver health and social care services, transformation and public health programmes.

Will the footprints replace other local NHS governance structures? (asked January 2017)

No – the local, statutory architecture for health and care remains, as does the existing accountabilities for Chief Executives of Local Councils, care provider organisations and CCG Accountable Officers.

This is about ensuring that organisations are able to work together at scale and across communities to plan for the needs of their population, and help deliver the Five Year Forward View – improving the quality of care, health, and NHS efficiency by 2020/21.

How does the sustainability transformation partnership area fit with other health and care footprints? (January 2017).

The boundaries used for STPs will not cover all planning eventualities - as with the current arrangements for planning and delivery, there are layers of plans which sit above and below STPs, with cross overs and dependencies.

For example, neighbouring STP areas will need to work together when planning specialised ambulance services or working with more than one local council or where there are cross overs on work such as stroke, urgent care and mental health.

How will other partners be involved? (asked February 2017)

The Partnership's are being developed with the close support and input of clinicians, staff and wider partners including local councils. We will engage with people about the operational ideas in the plan – we know we cannot transform health and social care without the active engagement of the clinicians and staff who actually deliver it, nor can we develop integrated care services, such as care closer to home, without understanding what our communities want and without our partners in local government.

There is also a Clinical Forum which is made up of GPs, and specialist consultants from whom we seek advice and guidance on clinical decisions and what this would mean in the medical field. We will also build on existing engagement through all the channels available to us and use this feedback to shape proposal for consultations. This will include actively seek wider partner involvement from the voluntary and community sector and the public in the development of our plan.

How is this work being funded? (asked February 2017)

The development of the plan is coming from existing health budgets, supported by a small programme management office.

Information, engagement and consultation – what will that mean? (asked February 2017).

We believe that to improve care for people, health and care services need to work more closely together, and in new ways. This means the public, carers, GPs, hospitals, local councils, provider organisations, the voluntary sector and commissioners all coming together to agree a plan to improve local health and care services. Helping people and families to plan ahead, stay well and get support when they need it in the most appropriate way with the resources and money we have available.

Engaging and communicating with partners, stakeholders and the public in the planning, design and delivery is essential if we are to get this right.

Effective communication and engagement is a two-way process. Our activity will focus on informing, sharing, listening and responding. Being proactive is central to our communications and engagement strategy.

What does the future success look like? (asked April 2017)

Our vision for West Yorkshire and Harrogate is for the whole population to have the best possible health and wellbeing. To achieve this, our health and care system needs to change.

In 2016, we face the most significant challenges for a generation. We know that we must keep innovating and improving if we are to meet the needs of our population in a tough financial climate. Demand for services is growing faster than resources. Services in some places are not designed to meet modern standards, and local people want things to be better, more joined up, and more aligned to their needs. This is clear from the continuous engagement we have with local people, as well as the changing world we live in.

If we get this right, together we will engage patients, people who access health and social care, carers, staff and communities from the start, allowing us to develop services that reflect their needs so that we can improve outcomes by 2020/21, closing all three gaps.

This will require a different type of planning process. It will require the NHS at both local and national level to work in partnership across organisational boundaries and sectors, and will require changes not just in process, but in culture and behaviour.

What role do local councils play? (Asked April 2017)

The NHS shared planning guidance, published in December 2015, explained that the success of STPs will depend on having an open, engaging process that harnesses the energies of clinicians, patients, carers, citizens, and local community partners including the independent and voluntary sectors, and local government through Health and Wellbeing Boards.

Indeed, around the country, a number of STP footprints are being led by local government leaders.Health and Wellbeing Boards also have a crucial role to play in this. Since 2012 they have been developing local health and wellbeing strategies based on the needs of local people. They bring together the NHS, public health, adult social care and children's services, including councillors and local Healthwatch, to plan how best to meet the needs of their local population and tackle local inequalities in health. They provide a way of ensuring that local people have a strong voice.

What is the role of the Health and Wellbeing Boards? (Asked April 2017)

Health and Wellbeing Boards have a crucial role to play in this. Since 2012 they have been developing local health and wellbeing strategies based on the needs of local people.

They bring together the NHS, public health, adult social care and children's services, including councillors and local Healthwatch, to plan how best to meet the needs of their local population and tackle local inequalities in health. They provide a way of ensuring that local people have a strong voice.

The West Yorkshire and Harrogate STP is built from six local area place-based plans; Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Harrogate and Rural District, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield. This is based around the established relationships of the six Health and Wellbeing Boards and builds on their local health and wellbeing strategies.

What are submission plans? (Asked April 2017)

Health and care partner organisations across West Yorkshire and Harrogate have been working together to develop the five year STP for seven months now. As the STP develops, updated versions have to be submitted to a group of national bodies including NHS England, NHS Improvement and the Local Government Association.

There have been two such checkpoint submissions so far, the most recent was on 30 June 2016, with a more detailed plan being drafted for 21 October.

This is a five year plan and the focus is on providers and commissioners collectively returning a currently unsustainable health and care system to long-term sustainability by 2020/21.

It’s great news that people are living longer than previous generations, but the reality is that up to two thirds of people in the UK could spend their retirement years in ill-health. An ageing population, people living longer with complex health and social care needs, means we have to change if we want to improve people’s quality of life and meet the challenges we face together with the money we have available.Although extra money has been made available nationally to support the NHS, this is not growing as fast as demand for care.

Budgets in social care, training, and public health are under additional pressure and have not been increased in the same way that some NHS funding has seen. Our workforce is also changing. We need to improve the way we do things if we are to meet changing needs whilst improving the health and wellbeing of people and fully supporting our staff.

Our planning for the STP is therefore emerging as we understand better how we collectively deliver sustainability, and our submissions to date represent checkpoints on how our plan is evolving.

Our work to date and what will happen next?

Year one (2016/17) and planning to date as a system has been about jointly understanding gaps and variations in outcomes, the pressures on services which are making them unsustainable and the contribution that collaborative programmes and local place-based plans can make to close the following three gaps over the next five year:

  • Health and wellbeing
  • Care and quality
  • Finance and efficiency

We will shortly begin conversations with staff, public and stakeholders. Public engagement will be used to shape and develop formal consultation.

Where can I read the plan?

The draft plan can be read here. On this page you can also read the public summary and watch a short film. There is also information on recent engagement and consultation work carried out across the area.

Are social care pressures and demand recognised in sustainability transformation plans (STPs)? (Asked April 2017)

Some two thirds of the 44 STP June submissions across England acknowledged the funding pressures on social care. It is essential that plans are whole-system and recognise the totality of the health and social care funding gap.

Are prevention and public health adequately resourced in sustainable transformation plans (STPs) ? (Asked April 2017)

Although all draft plans recognise the importance of investing in prevention, few describe in detail what this would look like, and some focus more narrowly on health prevention such as smoking cessation. The strongest prevention workstreams have clear leadership from health and wellbeing boards and local council senior officers including Directors of Public Health. They draw too on wider public sector reform, tapping into economic growth agendas.

Are the West Yorkshire Association of Acute Trusts (WYAAT) meetings open to the public?

The Board of each of the WYAAT trusts has agreed to form a Committee in Common which is responsible for leading the joint work programme and the development of the workstreams. The Chief Executive and Chair from each trust are members of the Committee in Common.

Each workstream has a number of projects underneath supported by a lead Chief Executive from one of the six trusts. The projects will put together a case for change that sets out how things are done now, what good or best practice is, how things need to change and the risks and benefits associated with this change. The cases for change will be considered by the Committee in Common before being recommended to each of the individual trust boards for approval.

The Committee in Common is a sub-committee of each of the Trust Boards and therefore as the Boards meet in public, the Committee doesn’t need to. It is a different model than the CCG Joint Committee where the final decision lies with the Joint Committee. WYAAT is more of a vehicle for the acute trusts to work together for the greater good of the WY community, but sovereignty remains with the individual NHS Trusts.

What evidence do you have that the mental health priorities you have chosen, for example, autism and eating disorders are priorities that would be agreed by people who use services and their carers?

The West Yorkshire and Harrogate (WY&H) mental health priorities have been informed by where it makes sense to do the work once across WY&H due to scale, or because it is an area challenging each local area and therefore there is strength in working together. Our priority areas are in the main national service improvement priorities too.

We know from the engagement work undertaken locally to date that people would like to see improvements in such areas as crisis services, children and young people's mental health services and more timely access to autism assessments. In addition to the WY&H priorities there is considerable work going on in each of the six local places e.g. Leeds, to improve mental health services with a strong focus on mental health wellbeing. As we acknowledged at the last Joint Committee of the 11 Clinical Commissioning Groups, there is more we need to do across the partnership to engage fully with people and we are in the process of developing an engagement plan to support our work on mental health.

As mentioned in the Joint Committee papers on the 7 November 2017 the elective care programme will provide the right care, at the right time, in the right place in order that the best outcomes for the population of West Yorkshire and Harrogate.

The aim of the programme is to reduce the variation in access to, and experience of services that currently exists across the West Yorkshire and Harrogate (WY&H) area. There are currently significant differences in how long people have to wait for certain services and also in what is available, for example the 'clinical threshold' applied before referral for some surgical procedures or the types of things that are available on prescription (e.g. gluten free foods or medicines that are available over-the-counter). By ironing-out this variation we will produce greater fairness and a reduction in the 'postcode lottery' in access to and availability of care. The significant savings to be made from this programme are longer term rather than short term, and come from reducing future demand for health care services by improving the health and well-being of the population of WY&H.

The programme is committed to undertaking a thorough equalities assessment, the findings of which will be used to shape the further development of the programme. This will include information from joint strategic needs assessments from across the whole area as well as other equalities information. The intention is that the findings of the equalities assessment will be applied in a way that enables the programme to work towards reducing existing health inequalities, rather than just protecting disadvantaged groups from being further disadvantaged.

Who are the members of the members of the leadership team? (Asked November 2017).

Current members – please note the information is correct as at 8 December 2017. We are revising the membership as part of the development of the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) and our work towards increasing local autonomy.

 

West Yorkshire and Harrogate, Health and Care Partnership (WY&H HCP), System Leadership Executive Group

 

  • Rob Webster, WY&H Health Care Partnership CEO Lead (Chair)
  • Jo Webster, representing CCGs (and Wakefield place)
  • Tom Riordan, representing local authority
  • Ian Cameron, representing public health
  • Julian Hartley, representing acute trusts
  • Nicola Lees, representing mental health providers
  • Professor Sean Duffy, Clinical Lead for Cancer Alliance
  • Rory Deighton, Healthwatch
  • Kirsty Baldwin, representing Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGPs) and member of the primary and community care work stream
  • Soo Nevison, representing voluntary and community sector
  • Moira Dumma, NHS England
  • Warren Brown, NHS Improvement
  • Matt Walsh representing Calderdale place
  • Amanda Bloor, representing Harrogate place
  • Helen Hirst, representing Bradford place
  • Carol McKenna, representing Kirklees place
  • Phil Corrigan, representing Leeds place
  • Cath Roff – representing adult social service
  • Rod Barnes – Yorkshire Ambulance Service
  • Ros Tolcher – workforce

 

Additional attendees:

  • Ian Holmes, WY&H Health and Care Partnership Director
  • Jonathan Webb, WY&H Health and Care Partnership, Finance Director

 

WY&H Joint Committee of Clinical Commissioning Groups

 

Lay members

  • Marie Burnham, Independent Lay Chair
  • Fatima Khan-Shah, Lay Member
  • Richard Wilkinson, Lay Member

Clinical Commissioning Group Members

 

Bradford (Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven, Bradford City and Bradford Districts)

  • Dr Akram Khan, GP Chair, Bradford City Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG)
  • Dr Andrew Withers, GP Chair, Bradford Districts CCG
  • Dr James Thomas, GP Chair, Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven CCG
  • Helen Hirst, Chief Officer, Bradford District and Craven CCGs

Calderdale

  • Dr Alan Brook, GP Chair of Calderdale CCG
  • Dr Matt Walsh, Chief Officer, Calderdale CCG

Greater Huddersfield

  • Dr Steve Ollerton, GP Chair, Greater Huddersfield CCG
  • Carol McKenna, Chief Officer, Greater Huddersfield CCG

Harrogate and Rural

  • Dr Alistair Ingram GP Chair, Harrogate and Rural District CCG
  • Amanda Bloor, Chief Officer, Harrogate and Rural District CCG

Leeds (Leeds North, Leeds West and Leeds South and East)

  • Dr Alistair Walling, GP Chair, Leeds South and East CCG
  • Dr Gordon Sinclair, GP Chair, Leeds West CCG
  • Dr Jason Broch, GP Chair, Leeds North CCG
  • Phil Corrigan, Chief Executive, for Leeds CCGs

North Kirklees

  • Dr David Kelly, GP Chair, North Kirklees CCG
  • Carol McKenna, Chief Officer, North Kirklees CCG

Wakefield

  • Jo Webster, Chief Officer, Wakefield CCG
  • Dr Phillip Earnshaw, GP Chair, Wakefield CCG

Additional attendees:

· Ian Holmes, WY&H Health and Care Partnership Director

· Jonathan Webb, WY&H Health and Care Partnership Finance Director

· Lou Auger, Director of Delivery, West Yorkshire, North Region NHS England

· Stephen Gregg, Joint Committee Governance Lead

 

West Yorkshire and Harrogate Clinical Forum

  • Dr Andy Withers, GP Chair, NHS Bradford Districts CCG (Chair)
  • Dr Bryan Gill, Medical Director, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dr Adam Sheppard, Assistant GP Chair, NHS Wakefield CCG
  • Dr Alan Brook, GP Chair, NHS Calderdale CCG
  • Dr David Birkenhead, Medical Director, Calderdale & Huddersfield Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dr David Kelly, GP Chair, NHS North Kirklees CCG
  • Dr Gordon Sinclair, GP Chair, NHS Leeds West CCG
  • Dr Jason Broch, GP Chair, NHS Leeds North CCG
  • Jo Harding, Director of Nursing & Quality, NHS Leeds CCGs
  • Dr Julian Mark, Medical Director, Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust
  • Dr Phillip Earnshaw, GP Chair, NHS Wakefield CCG
  • Dr Adrian Berry, Medical Director, South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dr Akram Khan, GP Chair, NHS Bradford City CCG
  • Dr Alistair Ingram, GP Chair, NHS Harrogate & Rural District CCG
  • Dr Alistair Walling, GP Chair and Director of Primary Care, Leeds South and East CCG
  • Dr Andy McElligott, Medical Director, Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dr Chris Welsh, Senate Chair, North Region (Yorkshire and the Humber), NHS England
  • Dr David Black, Joint Medical Director North Region (Yorkshire and the Humber) and Deputy National Clinical Director for Specialised Services, NHS England
  • Dr David Scullion, Medical Director, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dr James Thomas, GP Chair, NHS Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven CCG
  • Karen Dawber, Chief Nurse, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dr Karen Stone, Medical Director, Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Karl Mainprize, Executive Medical Director, Airedale General Hospital
  • Dr Steve Ollerton, GP Chair, NHS Greater Huddersfield CCG
  • Dr Yvette Oade, Executive Medical Officer, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

 

West Yorkshire Association of Acute Trusts (WYAAT) CEO Meeting

Members:

  • Julian Hartley, Chief Executive, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (Chair)
  • Bridget Fletcher, Chief Executive, Airedale NHS Foundation Trust
  • Clive Kay, Chief Executive, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
  • Owen Williams, Chief Executive, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust
  • Ros Tolcher, Chief Executive, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust
  • Martin Barkley, Chief Executive, Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

 

Additional attendees:

  • Matt Graham, WYAAT Programme Director

 

West Yorkshire Association of Acute Trusts (WYAAT) Committee in Common

 

Members:

· All six WYAAT CEOs (see list above)

· Michael Luger, Chairman, Airedale NHS Foundation Trust

· Professor Bill McCarthy, Chairperson, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

· Andrew Haigh, Chairman, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust

· Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust currently recruiting to a new Chair

· Dr Linda Pollard, Chair, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

· Jules Preston, Chairman, Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

 

Mental Health Trust Collaborative Executive Group

Members:

  • Rob Webster, Chief Executive of South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Dr Sara Munro, Chief Executive, Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Nicola Lees, Chief Executive, Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust
  • Thea Stein, Chief Executive, Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust

 

How were they appointed and who appointed them?

The leadership is made up of existing health care leaders already working across West Yorkshire and Harrogate organisations. The only appointment made was for Ian Holmes, Director of West Yorkshire and Harrogate, Health and Care Partnership. Ian was appointed in August 2016 by a partnership panel.

When did they decide to turn the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Partnership into an Accountable Care System ? (Asked December 2017).

No decision has been made. Our leadership team have discussed the benefits of greater autonomy and control over resources, including money, from national bodies, including NHS Englanda that this would bring to West Yorkshire and Harrogate. We believe that this is a route we should consider taking.

 

Our ambition is to move towards this in shadow form from April 2018. This is subject to all parties, including NHS England, being content that the freedoms, flexibilities and resources match the requirements for delivery in our partnership plan.

Who are the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Partnership Programme Directors?

Catherine Thompson, Elective Care and Standardisation of Commissioning Policies

Karen Poole, Maternity

Linda Driver, Stroke

Carol Ferguson, Cancer

Emma Fraser, Mental Health

Kathryn Hilliam, Primary and Community Care

Keith Wilson, Urgent and Emergency Care

Matt Graham, Acute Care Collaboration

Corinne Harvey, Prevention at Scale

Soo Nevison, Hannah Howe, Rory Deighton, Harnessing the Power of Communities

 

 

We also have enabling programme leads, these are:

Chris Mannion, Kate Holiday, Workforce:

Alastair Cartwright, Digital

Jonathan Webb, Capital and Estates

Jonathan Booker, Business Intelligence

Dawn Lawson and Matt Ward, Innovation and Improvement:

When and where was their "priority meeting" held, that discussed the Partnership's Memorandum of Understanding and any other matters relating to the proposed Integrated Care System? (Asked December 2017).

The programme directors meet as a group on a monthly basis. An important part of the way we work will be an agreement (or Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between partners and with national bodies. This will underpin the next phase of our development, setting out shared governance and accountability arrangements, and highlighting shared commitment to working together. This is part of ongoing conversations across the WY&H leadership meetings.

Why have these meetings been held in secret, without notifying or inviting the public to attend?

The discussions to date have been exploratory and for this reason have been held in private. We are committed to openness and transparency and when firmer proposals have been developed these will be presented to the appropriate forums in public.

 

A progress update was given to the West Yorkshire Joint Health and Overview Scruitny Committee on the 28 November 2017 and is also in our November blog 2017 which is publically available. You can read this here.

How many hospital beds have you found are available at trusts within your footprint as part of the Partnership's planning? (Asked January 2018)

In this context, ‘available’ should mean ‘which are available for patients to have treatment or care’, per the NHS England guidance for the KH03 bed availability and occupancy data collection. This should include overnight beds and day beds, and the number of beds by sector where possible (e.g. general and acute, maternity, mental illness & learning disability). This should be the latest available data (either quarter one or quarter two of 2017/18).

This information is available through the NHS England KH03 collection which can be found here: https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-...


 

How many community beds are currently available within the footprint?

This information is available through the NHS England KH03 collection which can be found here: https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-...

What plans are there to increase or reduce the number of beds (community and hospital) available within the footprint by 2020/21? How many beds are projected to be available by then (and again, please provide this information by sector if possible).

There are no current plans or projections in relation to the total number of beds across the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Partnership Footprint by 2020-21. Individual organisations may have their own plans but this information is not held at West Yorkshire and Harrogate level.

Please also send me any reviews, consultations, impact assessments carried out regarding the increase/decrease in the number of beds, and any evidence/clinical engagement that has been gathered or carried out to support both the assessment and the plan.

There are no reviews at West Yorkshire and Harrogate level that make a direct assessment of the number of beds required. Individual organisations may have carried out reviews / consultations on this, for example the Calderdale and Huddersfield FT public consultation includes information on future bed capacity. More information is available here http://www.cht.nhs.uk/about-us/right-care-time-pla...

Will West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership become an integrated care system? (Asked February 2018)

  • The members of West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership are working hard to strengthen our approach to collaborating more closely to achieve the ambitions for improving the health and care of people in this area that we set out in our draft proposals in November 2016.
  • As part of this we are continuing to discuss with NHS England (NHS E) and NHS Improvement (NHS I) how we might secure greater autonomy and support to progress these ambitions more quickly.
  • NHSE and NHSI have not set a firm timescale for any announcement of future accountable care systems. There is no delay. We will discuss with them whether this is an appropriate direction for West Yorkshire and Harrogate to pursue when the time is right for all partners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developing a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) (Asked February 2018)

Part of strengthening our partnership approach is the development of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). This will be an agreement between the West Yorkshire and Harrogate health and care partners, setting out the details of our commitment to work together in partnership to realise our shared ambitions. The MoU does not introduce new hierarchical arrangements. Rather, it builds on our current ways of working and will provide a new model of mutual accountability to underpin collective ownership of delivery. The MoU is at an early stage of development. We are discussing it with a range of stakeholders with the aim of finalising it later in the Spring.

Control total

The MoU is expected to commit the NHS organisations in West Yorkshire & Harrogate Health and Care Partnership to move towards a shared control for the region's annual £5bn healthcare budget. This will bring together the financial control totals that are currently set and agreed with individual CCGs and NHS providers. Financial control totals represent the minimum level of financial performance that organisations must deliver each year and for which they will be held accountable. Delivery of these financial control totals determine access to other incentive-related funds that are received by organisations in West Yorkshire and Harrogate. It is important to note that this is still in development - nothing has been agreed at this stage.

What are West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership doing for stroke care ? (Asked February 2018)

Why are we looking at stroke care?
The NHS Shared Planning Guidance asked every local health and care system in England to come together to create their own ambitious local plan for accelerating the implementation of the Five Year Forward View (5YFV).

These blueprints, called Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs), are place-based, multi-year plans built around the needs of local populations. You can read more here.

These plans are also described as the local version of a national plan called the Five Year Forward View, published in 2014. This sets out a vision of a better NHS, the steps we should take to get us there, and how everyone involved need to work together.

What has been happening over the past fourteen months with stroke care?

Our focus over the past fourteen months has been on improving ‘hyper acute’ stroke and ‘acute’ stroke services (hyper-acute refers to the first few hours and days after the stroke occurs) and making sure all stroke care services are ‘fit for the future’. This is one of the priority areas of work highlighted in the draft West Yorkshire and Harrogate plan. You can read more here.

Our work to date has highlighted the importance of ensuring our stroke work also focuses on the ‘whole stroke pathway’. This includes stroke prevention, community rehabilitation and after care support delivered in local places to meet the needs of specific populations, locally planned with a consistent approach determined by clinicians and key stakeholders working together across the area to further reduce variations and improve quality and stroke outcomes.

Our work is also about detecting and treating people who are at risk of stroke so that around 9 in 10 people with atrial fibrillation are managed by GPs with the best local treatments available to save people’s lives.

Why do we need to change stroke care?

We are using evidence from the stroke strategic case for change and our own engagement with patients, carers, staff and the public to support this work. For example, there is strong evidence that outcomes following stroke are better if people are treated in specialised centres, which treat a minimum number of strokes per year, even if this increases travelling time. This is also in line with the 7 day hospital standards specific to hyper acute stroke. In parallel, ongoing care and support should be provided at locations closer to where people live and they should be transferred to these services as soon as possible after initial treatment.

The ambitions of the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership are focused around achieving improved outcomes to address the health and well-being gap, the care and quality gap and ensuring we utilise our resources effectively.

What conversations have you had with patients, carers, staff and the public about stroke care?

In February and March 2017 we carried out initial stroke engagement work. This was led by Healthwatch and over 1,500 comments were received. You can read the report and supporting information here.

A clinical summit, made up of specialist stroke doctors, nurses, therapists etc., took place in May 2017. This highlighted there were opportunities to standardise how we provide care. Over 50 people attended this event.

On the 4 July 2017 the outcome of the engagement work and strategic case for change was presented to the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Joint Committee of the 11 Clinical Commissioning Groups (meeting in public). You can find out more about the work of the Joint Committee here.

On the 3 October 2017 the outcome of progress to date and next steps were considered by the West Yorkshire Association of Acute Trusts (WYAAT) Committee in Common.

The Joint Committee of the 11 Clinical Commissioning Groups met in public on the 7 November 2017. A stroke update was given. You can read this here.

A paper was also presented to the Joint Health and Overview Scrutiny Common the 28 November 2017.

Stroke care was also discussed at the WY&H HCP voluntary and community event in November and the unpaid carers’ event in December 2017.

2018 and ongoing

We continue to talk to staff throughout the programme of the work

On the 2 February 2018 we held an Improving Stroke Outcomes workshop to seek people’s views on our work to date and the development of decision making criteria for specialist stroke services. The workshop brought together a range of people from across West Yorkshire and Harrogate including colleagues working in health and social care, voluntary and community organisations, councillors, carers and people who have experienced a stroke. The outcome of these discussions are informing the next phase of our work.

We continue to incorporate feedback from other key stakeholders into our work. This includes West Yorkshire and Harrogate Clinical Forum, West Yorkshire Association of Acute Trust (WYAAT Committee in Common), medical directors and the Yorkshire Ambulance Service who provide care to our patients and also have access to the skills and expertise to carry out travel time analysis.

We are also working with stakeholders in other areas e.g. South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw and Humber Coast and Vale to learn from their work. We have had further discussions with the Yorkshire and Humber Clinical Senate to seek their views and expertise on clinical evidence to inform our work. Our work to date has been subject to review by NHS England as part of the assurance process.

What will happen next regarding stroke care?
Further workshops in each of our six local areas (Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Harrogate and Rural District, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield) will be taking place week commencing 26 March 2018. The sessions will include health care professionals, community organisations and importantly
people who have experienced stroke and carers who were unable to attend the 2 February 2018 workshop. The aims of these sessions are to seek people’s views on our work to date and gain their views on the development of decision making criteria for specialist stroke services to further inform our next steps;

A report will be developed summarising the February and March 2018 workshop outputs to further inform our work and will be published on our website.

The Joint Committee of the 11 Clinical Commissioning Groups will meet in public in June 2018. A stroke update will be given.

Further work with partners, stakeholders including voluntary and community organisations, public, patients and unpaid carers will follow. We will involve as many people as possible in these conversations so that everyone can have their say.

We have drafted some timelines for the coming months work. Please note these are subject to change. You can read them here (make link)

It is also important to note that no decision at this stage of our review process has been made about the number of units across West Yorkshire and Harrogate. We will progress the work over the coming months with the view to making a decision in the next few months on the readiness to consult with the public if appropriate.

Are you planning to consult on the proposals for stroke care?
Establishing what people, their families and carers and members of the public feel and experience about stroke care is very important to us. We are currently carrying out further analysis and developing criteria to inform the appraisal of options for specialist stroke services. No decision has been made on readiness to consult. Consultation will follow across the area as and when appropriate. Involving staff and communities in our plans is a priority to the partnership and we are committed to being open and honest throughout.

How are local issues related to specialist stroke services currently being addressed?
As the West Yorkshire and Harrogate stroke programme is still work in progress, local operational issues and actions to address them will continue to be addressed locally by the lead commissioner and provider colleagues. There will continue to be ongoing dialogue to ensure there is a shared understanding of the work taking place at both local and West Yorkshire and Harrogate levels. Any decisions taken locally to address local issues will be factored in to the West Yorkshire and Harrogate wide work.

 

 

 

 

Has the Partnership submitted a bid to NHS England to be part of the second wave of Integrated Care Systems , If so, was the bid successful or not? (asked March 2018)


The partnership has been having an ongoing discussion with the NHS regulatory bodies over recent months about whether joining the Integrated Care System Development Programme would be an appropriate step for WY&H to take. No decision has been made to whether we will do this. We expect to reach agreement on whether or not to proceed by early summer.

 

What is the role of the local place-based planners? (Asked April 2018)


The place-based planners group is not a decision-making forum. It is an informal management group which meets monthly. It brings together colleagues working on the local plans for each of the six places (Bradford District and Craven; Calderdale, Harrogate, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield) which make up the WY&H partnership, including from the councils and clinical commissioning groups. These place-based partnerships, overseen by Health and Wellbeing Boards, are key to achieving the ambitious improvements we want to see. The group provides a regular opportunity for colleagues to share with each other the details of some of the work taking place in their local areas to transform health and care services, and for the members of the West Yorkshire and Harrogate partnership team to update them on work taking place across the whole area.

Please can you advise me if your clinical commissioning group is planning to commission one or more Hyper Acute Stroke Units (HASU) for your patients? 

The Joint Committee of the Clinical Commissioning Groups is working with key stakeholders in the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership (WY&H HCP) Stroke Programme to look at how we:

• prevent strokes happening across the area;

• deliver effective care when people have a stroke; and

• ensure there is good support and rehabilitation for people after a stroke.

The focus of this work over the past fourteen months has been on improving ‘hyper acute’ stroke and ‘acute’ stroke services (hyper-acute refers to the first few hours and days after the stroke occurs) and making sure all stroke care services are ‘fit for the future’. This is one of the priority areas of work highlighted in the draft West Yorkshire and Harrogate Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP). 

Has a business case been prepared for HASUs in your area?  If so, please list any organisations who were paid to support the preparation of the business case and how much they were paid? (asked May 2018).

The West Yorkshire and Harrogate stroke programme are using evidence from the Stroke Strategic Case for Change and engagement that has taken place across the West Yorkshire and Harrogate area to support this work.  The next phase of the work will be to develop a business case which will inform discussions with key stakeholders as part of the NHS England Stage 2 Assurance process. 

Please can you send me a copy of the business case?

This will be available on the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership website following approval.

If you already have one or more HASUs in place, please can you send me any internal or external evaluations that have taken place?

West Yorkshire and Harrogate has five HASUs: 

• Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – Bradford Royal Infirmary;

• Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust – Calderdale Royal Hospital;

• Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust;

• Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust – Leeds General Infirmary; and

• Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trusts – Pinderfields Hospital.
 

A Strategic Case for Change was developed and has been published on the West Yorkshire and Harrogate STP website:
https://www.wyhpartnership.co.uk/application/files/3715/0296/6970/WY_HF_Stroke_HAS_SCfC_v6.0_approved_final_final.pdf

 
Before the publication of the Strategic Case for Change, the Yorkshire and Humber Strategic Clinical Networks published the Hyper Acute Stroke Services Yorkshire and the Humber ‘Blueprint’ for Yorkshire and the Humber Clinical Commissioning Groups. This is available from their website:
http://www.yhscn.nhs.uk/previous/Strokelegacy/stroke-documents-and-links.php
 

We have also engaged with people, including those who have experienced a stroke, carers and community organisations. You can read the findings in our reports at https://www.wyhpartnership.co.uk/get-involved/engagement

 

Please can you tell me the contact information for the lead(s) within your Partnership on obesity; both childhood and adult obesity. (Asked May 2018)

The vast majority of work on obesity across the West Yorkshire and Harrogate (WY&H) Partnership is carried out within the places that make up the Partnership – Bradford District and Craven, Calderdale, Harrogate, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield.  The WY&H Public Health Coordination Group oversees this placed-based work and is Chaired by Dr Ian Cameron, Director of Public Health for Leeds City Council.  Contact details:  Ian.Cameron@leeds.gov.uk

The WY&H Partnership also supports a specific programme of work at place level to reduce variation and equalise investment in bariatric surgery.  The Director of this work is Michelle Turner, Director of Quality for Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven,  Bradford City and Bradford Districts CCGs.  Contact details: Michelle.Turner@bradford.nhs.uk

In the new Integrated Urgent Care and Core Clinical Advisory Services, how does the NHS111 bit work with the Core Clinical Advisory Services? (August 2018)

In the new Integrated Urgent Care and Core Clinical Advisory Services, how does the NHS111 bit work with the Core Clinical Advisory Services? Will NHS 111 route patient calls to clinical teams who will actually see the patient? Or will that clinical consultation be on the phone/ video/online? And how realistic is the requirement that the clinical team completes the patient’s consultation without passing them on or referring them to another clinician, at A&E or elsewhere? Has the practicalities of turning intentions into reality started? What is Attains involvement and how much are they being paid?

The procurement process is underway and will confirm in due course which organisation will be awarded the contract. The new contract will deliver key elements of the nationally specified integrated urgent care service, in particular 111 call handling and clinical advice. It will take effect during 2019.  Attain have been commissioned on an interim basis to work alongside existing NHS staff, to support the procurement process using a competitive dialogue process through to mobilisation of the new service. Attain are working closely with existing staff to build both capacity and capability to support to the Yorkshire and the Humber project. The cost of this engagement is £238k.

 

The various standardisation's of services plans rely on the Right Care ‘Go Compare’-type tool - but are you aware of the criticisms that Right Care is based on dodgy statistics? (August 2018)

The various standardisations of services plans rely on the Right Care ‘Go Compare’-type tool - but are you aware of the criticisms that Right Care is based on dodgy statistics? These criticisms were published in the Journal of Public Health, in an article called Right Care, Wrong Answers, on 3 Nov 2017. How do you intend to respond to this peer-reviewed criticism of the Right Care methodology in future?

RightCare should not be viewed as providing directives to health economies as to how to act; rather it is intended as a tool to support enquiry by health economies as to opportunities to improve NHS quality and provision.  While a powerful tool, it needs to be combined with other data, including local environmental knowledge, to evaluate possible opportunities for improvement. 

What is an Integrated Care System (ICS)?

The Next Steps on the Five Year Forward View signalled a new approach to integrating care locally, referred to as ‘integrated care systems’. An ICS will be the most developed version of a sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP).  It will be given greater autonomy and financial backing from the centre in return for taking greater responsibility for delivery and finances across the patch.

How many integrated care systems are they?

We are only one of four partnerships to join wave two. This is national recognition for the way our WY&H partnership works - it means we can join the cutting edge of health and care policy, gaining more influence and more control over the way we deliver services and support for the 2.6 million people living across our area.

This was announced on the 24 May 2018.

You can read NHS England and NHS Improvement Board Meetings in Common – agenda and papers from the 24 May 2018 here for more information.

A first wave of eight shadow ICS was announced by NHS England and NHS Improvement in June 2017. They were placed into a development programme, along with the two health devolution areas (Greater Manchester and Surrey Downs). This brings a total of 12 out of 44 ICSs across the country.

What was the process?

NHS England and NHS Improvement invited West Yorkshire and Harrogate to submit an expression of interest to join the second wave of the ICS development programme. Local leaders agreed to proceed and we submitted our expression of interest in February 2018.

We heard in May 2018, in an announcement made by Simon Stevens, CEO for NHS England that we have been successful and will be joining the ICS development programme in shadow form immediately. Shadow form means we are preparing to become a formal integrated care system.

What benefits does being an ICS bring?

An ICS is a partnership that is given flexibility and freedoms in return for taking responsibility for the delivery of high quality services now and in the future. It brings together some elements of NHS regulatory functions with health and care commissioning and service provision.

With these new governance and accountability arrangements in place, our partnership would be able to take on greater responsibility for:

  • The planning and design of the change programmes that need to be driven once across West Yorkshire and Harrogate and overseeing delivery locally
  • Managing transformation funding and capital; and oversight and delivery of milestones set out in the WY&H plan.

Who made the decision to join the programme?

WY&H Health and Care Partnership leadership team discussed the benefits of securing greater autonomy and control over resources, including money, from national bodies that an ICS would bring to the area. Joining the development programme is a natural progression for our partnership and allows us to take on these responsibilities at a time that is right for us. It sits with our ethos of being ambitious for the people we serve and demonstrates our commitment to improving health and care for everyone.

As a network of leaders running the second biggest partnership in the country (2.6 million people, £5 billion budget), we feel we have the leadership needed as well as the opportunity to contribute significantly to this way of working. It will also mean we receive a fair share of new national resources to deploy locally, rather than having to bid for money in small lots.

Our Partnership is made up of over twenty organisations, including Healthwatch, care providers and community organisations. Working with and for communities is also a priority to us. You can see a list of some of our partners here

What does this mean for local places (Bradford District and Craven; Calderdale, Harrogate, Leeds, Kirklees and Wakefield)?

Each of our local places is working through how they will work together more closely to further develop their partnership approach. It’s clear that our local places will have different plans and what is right for one may not be for another. In line with our WY&H plan, (a public summary is available here) all decisions on services need to be made locally as close to people as possible. Our move to becoming an ICS is predicated on this continuing to be the case.

The WY&H ICS will therefore focus on the work that can only be done at this level i.e. the nine programmes, for example cancer, mental health, stroke, urgent and emergency care.

Why now?

Since the creation of West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership in March 2016, the way we work has been further strengthened by a shared commitment to deliver the best health and care outcomes possible for the 2.6million people living across our area. Our commitment remains the same and our goal is simple, we want everyone in West Yorkshire and Harrogate to have a great start in life, and the support they need to stay healthy and live longer. We are committed to tackling health inequalities and to improving the lives of the poorest the fastest. This is a natural extension of the way we have been working across the area and is a strong endorsement of the progress we are making.

Why is working in this way important?

The importance of joining up services for people at a local level in Bradford District and Craven; Calderdale; Harrogate and Rural District; Kirklees; Leeds; and Wakefield is at the heart of our local plans and our WY&H programmes. All decisions on services are made as locally and as close to people as possible. Our move to becoming an ICS is predicated on this continuing to be the case. 

This integrated approach to health and care continues much closer working between our organisations, rather than traditional, top down approaches based on mergers or the creation of a new organisation. This demonstrates our distributed model of leadership and focus on prevention, wellbeing, communities, primary care, mental health, acute services and world class innovation is being supported. 

This recognition allows us to continue strengthening our partnership. It also means we can begin to develop the formal delegation of money and resources to WY&H over the coming year. This is very important to us.

What does this mean for communities?

Joining up health and care will improve the health and wellbeing of our communities. New ways of working will improve care we offer to people – integrated teams are good news. The Partnership are working together in a much more joined up way than ever before.

We have good working relationships and shared goals across our local areas and wider WY&H work. This is the way the NHS will consider funding in future and we know this is important to secure investment across WY&H to improve health outcomes and prevent ill health.

The ambitious proposals set out in our plan are firming up into specific actions, backed by investments. This is being done with the help of our staff and communities, alongside their representatives, including voluntary, community organisations and local councillors. Our bottom up approach means that this is happening at both a local and WY&H level, which puts people, not organisations, at the heart of everything we do.

What is the Memorandum of Understanding?

Part of strengthening our approach is the development of a MoU. This will be an agreement between the WY&H health and care partners, setting out the details of our commitment to work together in partnership to realise our shared ambitions. The MoU does not introduce new hierarchical arrangements. Rather, it builds on our current ways of working and will provide a new model of mutual accountability to underpin collective ownership of delivery.

This is different to be being an ICS.

The MoU is expected to commit the NHS organisations in the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership to move towards collective oversight of the region’s annual £5bn healthcare budget. It is important to note that these arrangements are still in development so nothing has been agreed at this stage. It will only be finalised once partners have agreed.

Why does the name keep changing?

Over the past 18 months there has been considerable focus nationally on terminology for this way of working with various names being used, for example ‘sustainability transformation partnerships (STPs)’ and more recently ‘accountable care systems/organisations/integrated care systems’. Some of the terms are close to those used by the system in the USA, which has led to suggestions of privatisation and insurance style models. This is incorrect.

We remain clear that we are working towards greater autonomy and more flexibility in the way we manage so we can further develop and deliver high quality health care services now and in the future. This means national labels like being an integrated care system may be applied, but what we actually want to achieve is far more than a name. We are proud to remain the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership.

Are you privatising the NHS?

There is absolutely no intention to move healthcare away from being entirely publically funded. What we really want is to make ways of working for staff much easier – something that we have heard loud and clear, more local control and freedom to make decisions for people and additional funding to support our plans, at both a local place level and across our West Yorkshire and Harrogate priorities. So we have the whole system working for the whole system with one budget and so people don’t have to repeat their story over and over again.

The main participants involved in developing integrated care are NHS organisations and partners in the public sector and they are making progress by collaborating not competing.

What will it look and feel like?

What we hope people will see over the coming months is evidence of the trust and collective leadership across our partnership so that together we can effectively support many more people in their homes, whilst reducing hospital demand and fully supporting GP practices and community services so they are able to become the first point of contact for health no matter what time of day.

We want to further develop services to help people stay well, whilst delivering more care in the community, so together we free up specialist hospital care to concentrate on what only they can do. 

Considerable effort and commitment from many partners has helped us to get to this point and we are now in an even stronger position to move forward together as one health care system.

It will also mean we have a simplified and streamlined set of relationships with national bodies, i.e. NHS England (NHS E) and NHS Improvement (NHS 1) so that our partnership working becomes easier. To help us achieve this NHSE and NHSI have provided us with staff to support our journey to become an integrated care system in shadow format.

What about commissioning?

We have strengthened our joint commissioning across West Yorkshire and Harrogate through the creation of a joint committee of CCGs, which has delegated authority for collective decision making from the nine CCGs in the partnership. In each place, collaborative commissioning between CCGs and local government continues to strengthen, so that we commission care that is more joined up. You can find out more about Joint Committee here.

What next?

Following our principles of openness and transparency we are continuing to have conversations with partnership employees and stakeholders, including local people and their representatives i.e. MPs, councillors, members of the West Yorkshire Joint Health Overview Scrutiny Committee, local Health Overview Scrutiny Committees and Health and Wellbeing Boards, we will continue to work together as we develop our integrated approach.

What about the voluntary and community sector? (VCS)

We already work closely with Healthwatch and many community organisations. We aim to achieve closer partnership working with shared objectives in each of the six local places (Bradford District and Craven; Calderdale, Harrogate, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield) and across the WY&H programme priorities. This includes health and care partners, including VCS, housing and employment services working together. Some of our local places have memorandums of understanding to help formalise this way of working and many, if not all, are working very closely with the VCS already. And also lots of care providers.

What about our workforce?

West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership will publish their workforce plan ‘A healthy place to live, a great place to work’ in June 2018.

The publication describes how the health and social care workforce of over 100,000 in West Yorkshire and Harrogate is changing to meet the current and future needs of the 2.6 million people living across the area.

Reshaping healthcare requires a reshaping of the health and care workforce. New teams are emerging with an increased role for non-medical staff to work alongside medical staff; non-registered staff to work alongside registered professionals and new roles alongside traditional ones.

There are over 260,000 carers in WY&H, what are you doing for them?

The Workforce Plan also recognises the huge contribution community organisations and volunteers make; and the vital role of the 260,000 unpaid carers who care for family and friends day in day out and whose numbers are more than that of the paid workforce. Supporting working carers is also an important partnership priority. You can read more about our approach to improve the support for unpaid carers in West Yorkshire and Harrogate here.

This means at all levels the Partnership is:

  • Working to improve people’s health with and for them
  • Working to improve people’s experience of health and care
  • Making every penny in the pound count to offer best value to the taxpayer.